Parent or Cop… Which One Are You?

By Safe Call Now’s Dr. Laura Brodie Ph.D.

In my work with cops, I’ve worked with their kids. Cops need to hear what their kids are complaining about. “He treats me like a suspect.” “She doesn’t trust me.” “He is cold and unfeeling, telling me what I’m doing wrong and never what I’m doing right.” But in talking to cops, I hear over and over how much they love their kids and remain confused about why their children do not feel their love.

Being a cop is a job that bleeds over to one’s personal life. The same can be said with psychologists. We psychologists place our own children on the couch of “processing” everything instead of allowing our children to simply be kids. Cops tend to respond to rule breaking in a matter of fact way, slap on the cuffs and haul them in. But what if this person is your child?

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Living with PTSD…

By Serve & Protect’s Chaplain Ronald Jones

Albert Einstein stated, “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.” Sounds very similar to a principle Jesus Christ taught, “If you are faithful in little things, you will be faithful in large ones. But if you are dishonest in little things, you won’t be honest with greater responsibilities” (Luke 16:10). I would encourage the reading of this chapter in its entirety as it holds as much relevance today as when first spoke by Christ.

Look at what is stated or implied: faithful, honesty, responsibilities, trustworthiness, character, fidelity, management, conscience, habit, honor, opportunity, diligence, foresight, duty, and integrity; just to name a few descriptors. As first responders we have all heard and spoke these words in our oath, pledge, vow, affirmation, promise, or testimony.

We live by creeds and ethos; no one left behind, we all go home, watch your six, I’ve got your back…

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Was “EMDR” an Accidental Discovery???

One of the most effective treatments for PTSD was discovered incidentally by Francine Shapiro, PhD, in 1987. When Shapiro was hiking and became anxious and overwhelmed, she noticed that as she scanned the environment with her eyes, moving them back and forth, she began to relax. This led her to assume that eye movements had a desensitizing effect, and when she experimented with it clinically, she found that other people had the same response. It became apparent that eye movements alone weren’t comprehensive, so she added other treatment elements and developed Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.

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